Phd Students

MS. JANE KARIMI MUTURI

 MS. JANE KARIMI MUTURI

“Feeling a little uncomfortable with your skills is a sign of learning, and continuous learning is what the tech industry thrives on! It’s important to seek out environments where you are supported, but where you have the chance to be uncomfortable and learn new things.”

Project Summary

“Feeling a little uncomfortable with your skills is a sign of learning, and continuous learning is what the tech industry thrives on! It’s important to seek out environments where you are supported, but where you have the chance to be uncomfortable and learn new things.”

Links

Jane Chepngetich Chelule

Jane Chepngetich Chelule

“Feeling a little uncomfortable with your skills is a sign of learning, and continuous learning is what the tech industry thrives on! It’s important to seek out environments where you are supported, but where you have the chance to be uncomfortable and learn new things.”

Project Summary

“Feeling a little uncomfortable with your skills is a sign of learning, and continuous learning is what the tech industry thrives on! It’s important to seek out environments where you are supported, but where you have the chance to be uncomfortable and learn new things.”

Links

Dr. Keller Justine Ndongo

Dr. Keller Justine Ndongo

Dr. Keller Justine Ndongo is a French trained General Practice Family Doctor. He graduated in 1991 from Toulouse Rangueil University of Medicine France and has additional qualifications in ultrasound, additions, emergency medicine, traumatology and pneumology.

After his military service in the air force, he has worked for more than 15 years in the French countryside and mountainous regions including in some remote places and ski resorts.

Dr Gaudeul’s has extensive medical experience across general medicine, emergency medicine, radiology, trauma, pneumology, addictions and paediatrics.

Project Summary

An abstract is a short summary of a longer work (such as a dissertation or research paper). The abstract concisely reports the aims and outcomes of your research so that readers know exactly what the paper is about.

Write the abstract at the very end, when you’ve completed the rest of the text. There are four things you need to include:

  1. Your research problem and objectives
  2. Your methods
  3. Your key results or arguments
  4. Your conclusion

An abstract is usually around 150–300 words, but there’s often a strict word limit, so make sure to check the requirements of the university or journal.

Links